Welcome to the Wild-About-Trapping.com Forums

Friends, Family and Outdoor Traditions
It is currently 20 Oct 2017, 04:01

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 44 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Just curious as to why
PostPosted: 15 Jan 2015, 15:36 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper

Joined: 28 Jan 2011, 16:07
Posts: 3079
Location: northwestern Ontario
Over the past years the dirt hole set that many use has been the topic of great concern many times over on this forum and others. The proper bedding of traps to dry dirt. All very good info I might add. But it seems to me everyone is dealing with the same problems over and over again when it comes to weather. I know the dirt hole set is a mass producer of fur but also of failure due to conditions. Being on top of your game will defiantly help but is there no other alterative when setting traps besides using dirt.
Using dirt hole sets up here is next to useless before old man winter sets in. Might have a week or two maybe. But I found other things such as leaves, moss, bull rushes and needles off trees that work great and if wet do not freeze solid like when using dirt and the traps are still operative. I was just curious as to why it's always the same set up and nothing different when circumstances present other opportunities?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 15 Jan 2015, 17:33 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User

Joined: 16 Jan 2012, 21:13
Posts: 269
Location: Central Missouri
Well for starters, some states (such as mine) don't allow snares on dry land. Obviously snares are the winner as far as reliability in cold weather. The cable restraints we can use are ok, but an experienced snaresman such as yourself can probably see some issues with holding a yote in a cable restraint overnight. So, that's why the majority of use use mostly footholds. As far as specific sets other than the dirt hole, all will pose the same problems with freezing besides the hay set. Fox and bobcat may be fooled, but I suspect coyote catches will be significantly lower than with a dirt hole, due to trap being above ground, and the yote feeling the jaws and what not. You mention using things such as peat moss, buckwheat hulls, etc. I've tried buckwheat hulls and I can tell you, bedding with them is a joke. Even if you could get it bedded solid the cushy feeling compared to the ground around it would surely set a yote off, I can imagine it's the same deal with most other bedding materials. I've been using dry dirt with liberal amounts of salt. This has worked pretty well for me as long as the ground stays solid. The problems come when the ground freezes and thaws overnight. Next year I plan to make up some waxed dirt.

_________________
MIZ-ZOU!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 15 Jan 2015, 18:01 
Offline
Trapper
Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 01 Jan 2015, 02:31
Posts: 29
It might be the mentality of new trappers to be honest I'm still very new so I hope this doesn't offend anyone. I believe maybe its talked about more because that's what a lot of new trappers or a trapper not thinking outside of What he has learned on youtube or a book ( i was this way )such as flat sets scent posts gang sets in trails and many others so you mainly hear about dirt holes. Just my two cents worth


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 15 Jan 2015, 22:07 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper

Joined: 06 Nov 2013, 18:01
Posts: 1369
Without snares footholds are the only option here. The dirt hole can be problematic with thawing and freezing temps(now!). Most literature extolls the virtues of dirtholes so many novice or inexperienced trappers pound them in again and again. Perfect weather they are a breeze to maintain but.... I know K9ers that quit when it becomes futile to run dirtholes. We make variations of them like covering the trap bed up to the hole in a solid chunk of bark etc but its only a matter of time most years before we have dinner plate size mudsicles..

_________________
Waitin for the leaves to fall...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 15 Jan 2015, 22:21 
Offline
THE GRINNER WHISPERER
THE GRINNER WHISPERER
User avatar

Joined: 19 Aug 2008, 07:07
Posts: 5392
That ol' dirthole is an easy set to make, and I think maybe the use of bait helps with the trappers confidence over sets placed without bait or lure, the blind set. I've grown very fond of the blind set over the past few years. Nothing better than catching a target using nothing but the trap and having the foot hit the pan. However, I still like the dirthole in areas where it would be a ton of work to guide the foot to the pan in the blind set, like in a field edge of a cut bean field. There the dirt hole has eye appeal that sparks the curiosity of an animal. Any of the hundreds of variations of dirthole sets would do the same. I like to use peat moss for bedding. It's not perfect, freeze/thaw cycles, that iloveguns mentioned, settle the bedding and you have to add more occasionally. But you throw some calcium chloride in the mix and it keeps the set working well. There is a different feel to it, but there is nothing wrong with blending in the set with some surrounding chaff.

_________________
Roadkill is a redneck's paycheck- Jase Robertson

The second amendment is in place in case the others are ignored.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 15 Jan 2015, 22:43 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 24 Dec 2009, 15:09
Posts: 3736
Location: Eastern S. Dakota
I like and have used flat sets more than dirt holes because I'm not coordinated enough to dig a dirt hole :wink:

_________________
"And God said, Let us make man in our image …and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, …the fowl of the air…and all the creatures that move along the ground.
Genesis 1:26


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 15 Jan 2015, 22:48 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 24 Dec 2009, 15:09
Posts: 3736
Location: Eastern S. Dakota
P.S. So there is a difference between a snare and a cable restraint?? I always though a CR was just a pc term for a snare that would mollify the antis and the clueless a bit more than "snare" (see you can sneer and sound mean saying snare but can't do it as easy with CABLE RESTRAINT). Any of you all that actually use them will have to post a pix of one in action. I'd like to see it :)

_________________
"And God said, Let us make man in our image …and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, …the fowl of the air…and all the creatures that move along the ground.
Genesis 1:26


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2015, 00:32 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User

Joined: 16 Jan 2012, 21:13
Posts: 269
Location: Central Missouri
NonPCfed wrote:
P.S. So there is a difference between a snare and a cable restraint?? I always though a CR was just a pc term for a snare that would mollify the antis and the clueless a bit more than "snare" (see you can sneer and sound mean saying snare but can't do it as easy with CABLE RESTRAINT). Any of you all that actually use them will have to post a pix of one in action. I'd like to see it :)


Lol, NonPC, cable restraint is a fancy word for a snare that doesn't kill the quarry. They have a stop that prevents them from closing to less than 2 1/2" in diameter, and in theory they hold the coyote until you get there. There are plenty of problems with them, such as chewing, kinking, and just the flat out hassle of setting. (they can't be set near any vegetation over 1/2" thick unless it's cut and stuck back in the ground, can't be set right under a fence, etc.) Plus we have to be certified by taking a course, which is the main reason I haven't used them yet. But I plan on trying it next year.

For more info, Google "cable restraints in missouri" and click on the link from missouri department of conservation. They have the whole booklet online that you can look through. It even has pictures!!! :o

_________________
MIZ-ZOU!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2015, 05:10 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User

Joined: 17 Jan 2008, 10:51
Posts: 914
Sounds like Mo needs to get rid of a bunch of liberal shmucks in political office........ :?



I get what wolf is saying.....there is no denying the problems with using dirt and dirt holes because of weather conditions. I know i grow weary of having to rebuild every set if it rains then freezes. I dont have much problem with freezing just because of cold normally. For me, between using quality antifreeze and a covering such as peat, unless freezing rain hits im good to go. However i try to abstain from dirt holes and use flat sets mainly anymore. So much less digging and that is huge when the ground freezes hard when making new sets. New sets are the main problem in frozen ground. However many many times I have over come this problem though. I think what wolf is trying to say, is where there is strong determind will, there will be a way. If we always do what we have always done, we will always get what we have always had. Thinking outside the box is the point. There is no way a person can just continue to do what worked back in November or December without huge road blocks and problems. It requires a whole mind set change. Animals can be caught many ways in many various habitats though they are the same animals. Patterns tend to change anyway as the heart of winter comes on so we need to change. I dont HAVE to go beyond what i do in thinking when addressing set types and problems associated with because i go to snares in rough weather times.. This year is a prime example of a curve ball. No snow to insulate the ground with butt cold temps. Digging new sets in right now is a job and a half and not worth it for the most part for me when snares are availiable. You can bet though that if/when I need to get steel in the ground its going to happen. For instance,,,,I will be putting in a small handful of footholds very soon among my snares in one area because im dealing with a slippery cat that dont seem to want to oblige the snares.Coyotes may be the hardest to over come by alternative coverings.... but there is a way to camo it so that you still catch them. Ive done it many times, much like what wolf described. Its a pain in the keester no doubt when dealing with bad conditions, but in some instances its that or quit.....i dont feel like taking up needle point just yet so i think i'll find a way. The dirt hole will NOT be part of my plan.

_________________
}}}}}=========€ >


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2015, 08:18 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 09 Nov 2010, 11:58
Posts: 1302
Location: Kansas
The absolute best way I found to deal with getting dirt holes in is to dig them preseason and dig plenty. 3 holes to every trap you plan to set is a good bet. I only use the dirt holes up through December with plenty of flat sets mixed in. January dirt holes are done for me and it's stricly flat set from there on because of breeding season for yotes. Like Amak said, a "Good" quality antifreeze and I use plenty of it. I do think that I miss a few yotes because of it. I do believe they can smell it, but I would rather miss a few than have all my sets freeze and miss them all. With the system I am useing now I have had little problem with traps being froze in. If I do have some problems it is the top covering over my steel screen and over the levers. All I have to do is lift that top covering off and resift with new dirt. I never have to remake the set. The antifreeze under the trap keeps it working. It only takes a minute or two to do it.

_________________
A WISE MAN PROFITS BY THE MISTAKES HE MAKES.
A FOOL NEVER SEES THE ONE HE MAKES. (Harold Warp)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2015, 08:52 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper

Joined: 28 Jan 2011, 16:07
Posts: 3079
Location: northwestern Ontario
Thanks everyone for your input. I was not trying to knock the dirt hole set nor was I saying snares work better. Amak I think understood my question best. Thanks again for your reply.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2015, 09:07 
Offline
KING OF THE POSTERS
KING OF THE POSTERS
User avatar

Joined: 03 Feb 2008, 12:18
Posts: 16400
Location: Lufkin, TX
Wolf, this was a good topic. I think what most of us do is get into dealing with our own terrains and never give much thought to what it would be like to trap in another area. When I visited you in Ontario I realized I would not have known how to catch a single thing up there. It was nothing like anything I'd ever dealt with...but Y'all have it down to a science! Or when I visited doc and saw all the rocks that he has to deal with and the lack of many trees in the areas of KS that I have visited. But in each area the trappers seem to come up with good resolutions to the situations and make do with what they have to deal with.

_________________
Actions Speak Louder Than Words


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2015, 14:09 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: 30 Jan 2010, 16:53
Posts: 2998
Location: Minnesota
For me, Wolf, it's about the challenge of figuring out how to use a foothold in snow. I know snares are the way to go, but I also know there are trappers that are successful with footholds all winter. It took me a few seasons to really get proficient in the dirt, I want the same thing all season. Especially since our dirt season is about as long as yours.

_________________
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2015, 19:42 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper

Joined: 28 Jan 2011, 16:07
Posts: 3079
Location: northwestern Ontario
TrapperAL wrote:
For me, Wolf, it's about the challenge of figuring out how to use a foothold in snow. I know snares are the way to go, but I also know there are trappers that are successful with footholds all winter. It took me a few seasons to really get proficient in the dirt, I want the same thing all season. Especially since our dirt season is about as long as yours.


Correct Al, I was not always a snare person and leg holds were everything. I have many tricks when it comes to setting in snow with leg holds but over the years things are fading. Not that I want it to, but is not feasible for me to do so. Most of my sets involved snow machine and trail sets. Something that is not used south of us to any extent. Although we all trap in different regions some times it pays to think out side the box instead of following the norm. Really this was what my question was about. Don't be afraid to try something different even if it seems redinkulus.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2015, 21:36 
Offline
Trapper
Trapper

Joined: 07 Jan 2015, 18:53
Posts: 39
Location: Waverly, NE
When the ground freezes I've always thought I had good luck using my axe to chop out a hole for my traps. Doesn't take very long, and they always come out looking natural to me.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 03:35 
Offline
Trapper
Trapper

Joined: 02 May 2013, 08:05
Posts: 81
Location: SW Mo
[quote="Amak"]Sounds like Mo needs to get rid of a bunch of liberal shmucks in political office........ :?

Actually Mo. has among the best trapping regs I've seen, no trap size restrictions, no limits, etc. NRs have exactly the same deal as residents; in the entirety the regs take up three pages in a 3"x5" booklet. The thing is dogs are highly protected in Mo. due to a 1869 lawsuit. You can read about it here; http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/educatio ... ornsby.asp

Our CRs are not quite as bad as other states, we have a choice of locks (as long as it quits tightening when the animal quits pulling, includes almost every lock except spring loaded) and some freedom of cable; biggest drawback to our CR regs is zero entanglement. i can set a few footholds in the same time that it takes to cut and "replant" the bushes, but a lot of guys in the prairie areas do well with them. They seem to favor 1x19 5/64" and micro locks.
PC, yes. But it also distinguishes between snares we can set in water and snares we can set on land, as there are some differences.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 04:02 
Offline
Trapper
Trapper

Joined: 02 May 2013, 08:05
Posts: 81
Location: SW Mo
wolf1199 wrote:
Over the past years the dirt hole set that many use has been the topic of great concern many times over on this forum and others. The proper bedding of traps to dry dirt. All very good info I might add. But it seems to me everyone is dealing with the same problems over and over again when it comes to weather. I know the dirt hole set is a mass producer of fur but also of failure due to conditions. Being on top of your game will defiantly help but is there no other alterative when setting traps besides using dirt.
Using dirt hole sets up here is next to useless before old man winter sets in. Might have a week or two maybe. But I found other things such as leaves, moss, bull rushes and needles off trees that work great and if wet do not freeze solid like when using dirt and the traps are still operative. I was just curious as to why it's always the same set up and nothing different when circumstances present other opportunities?


A big part of this is because many of the trappers on the net learned on the net and only know what utube has taught them. Famous trapper said on another forum "he doesn't know what he doesn't know"' , meaning it's hard to teach someone who doesn't understand that he needs to learn; for those of us that learned with out Internet and perhaps with out even a book, we had no box to think outside of. The world was our box. We learned as we went from the critters and our observations, having no preconceptions of the right and proper way to catch an animal made innovation natural.
I do a lot of time on the net nowadays and it is not only dirtholes but every aspect of trapping that gets rehashed over and over. These young people (in the USA) are products of our public education system, which is geared to leave no child behind. Keeping all children on the same level as the least able insures that they have never been taught to learn, but only to repeat what they have been told.
I may over simplify when I talk to the new trappers, but my instruction is usually along the lines of "put some stinky stuff out there and set a trap some where close to it, what ever trap you have in your hand will probably work". I want them to do something and having done that they then have a basis to learn.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 09:53 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 24 Dec 2009, 15:09
Posts: 3736
Location: Eastern S. Dakota
Here are SD's snare regs. We also have a minimum closing diameter. I suspect most states that allow snares do:

Snares
Snares must have a mechanical lock, swivel
device on the anchor end, and stop device to
prohibit the restraint loop from closing to a diameter
less than 2-1/2 inches. Snares must be attached
by the swivel directly to the anchoring device
or by chain or cable between the swivel and the
anchoring device. The swivel may not be more than
four inches long, and must operate freely when set.
Attaching snares to a drag is prohibited. Exempt
from the above restriction that requires the use
of permanent stop are snares that have a lock or
device with a breaking strength of 350 pounds of
pressure or less. Trappers who use these types of
snares must submit the snare for breaking strength
testing if requested by a GFP representative.
It is unlawful to possess or transport snares
not properly equipped, except manufacturers may
obtain a free Shipping and Transportation Permit
from a GFP conservation officer to ship or transport
snares to another area that does not require the
same equipment as South Dakota.
Snares are prohibited May 1-Nov. 13 on
improved road rights-of-way and on all public lands
statewide

_________________
"And God said, Let us make man in our image …and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, …the fowl of the air…and all the creatures that move along the ground.
Genesis 1:26


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 10:05 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User

Joined: 17 Jan 2008, 10:51
Posts: 914
tjm wrote:
Amak wrote:
Sounds like Mo needs to get rid of a bunch of liberal shmucks in political office........ :?

Actually Mo. has among the best trapping regs I've seen, no trap size restrictions, no limits, etc. NRs have exactly the same deal as residents; in the entirety the regs take up three pages in a 3"x5" booklet. The thing is dogs are highly protected in Mo. due to a 1869 lawsuit. You can read about it here; http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/educatio ... ornsby.asp

Our CRs are not quite as bad as other states, we have a choice of locks (as long as it quits tightening when the animal quits pulling, includes almost every lock except spring loaded) and some freedom of cable; biggest drawback to our CR regs is zero entanglement. i can set a few footholds in the same time that it takes to cut and "replant" the bushes, but a lot of guys in the prairie areas do well with them. They seem to favor 1x19 5/64" and micro locks.
PC, yes. But it also distinguishes between snares we can set in water and snares we can set on land, as there are some differences.




Maybe this is a case of what you are use to? If you are happy thats what counts. Mo is very much restricted compared to my State and some others in the mid west. Granted i've seen much worse for certain, but its the truth......and it is political largely as the cause. An 1800's law suit seems like a great excuse to excercise power. Many things were going on back that far in time...Judicially, the laws can be enterpreted with a liberal mindset and laws can be inacted by those same liberal ideas, but that doesnt mean they are right or better. Judges and decision makers are voted into office or appointed by those who are voted into office. If the structure is liberal so will the laws and regs be more restrictive. Seems to me the hold harmless laws could be changed or imputed instead of imputing trapper regulations because of a single case. But with a conservative mind set, there are always going to be those disagreements with liberal operations.

_________________
}}}}}=========€ >


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 11:31 
Offline
Trapper
Trapper

Joined: 02 May 2013, 08:05
Posts: 81
Location: SW Mo
we are restricted on snares no doubt.
That law suit has governed every dog law since and will forever I suppose. In that respect dog owners can't put their own dog down. I don't think legislators can change case law, but I'm not a lawyer.
Have no idea if you even live in a state, so can't speak to what your restrictions are or are not.
Only restriction on footholds is they must be smooth or rubber jawed, killer traps on land have to be 5x5 which is plenty big to kill a house dog, colony traps 6x6 opening ; any other restrictions on traps I'm not aware of. That and the seasons about sums up all our regs,

But, I'll bet that you are right and almost all the states have regs that total less than 15 paragraphs.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 22:09 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper

Joined: 28 Jan 2011, 16:07
Posts: 3079
Location: northwestern Ontario
tjm wrote:
wolf1199 wrote:
Over the past years the dirt hole set that many use has been the topic of great concern many times over on this forum and others. The proper bedding of traps to dry dirt. All very good info I might add. But it seems to me everyone is dealing with the same problems over and over again when it comes to weather. I know the dirt hole set is a mass producer of fur but also of failure due to conditions. Being on top of your game will defiantly help but is there no other alterative when setting traps besides using dirt.
Using dirt hole sets up here is next to useless before old man winter sets in. Might have a week or two maybe. But I found other things such as leaves, moss, bull rushes and needles off trees that work great and if wet do not freeze solid like when using dirt and the traps are still operative. I was just curious as to why it's always the same set up and nothing different when circumstances present other opportunities?


A big part of this is because many of the trappers on the net learned on the net and only know what utube has taught them. Famous trapper said on another forum "he doesn't know what he doesn't know"' , meaning it's hard to teach someone who doesn't understand that he needs to learn; for those of us that learned with out Internet and perhaps with out even a book, we had no box to think outside of. The world was our box. We learned as we went from the critters and our observations, having no preconceptions of the right and proper way to catch an animal made innovation natural.
I do a lot of time on the net nowadays and it is not only dirtholes but every aspect of trapping that gets rehashed over and over. These young people (in the USA) are products of our public education system, which is geared to leave no child behind. Keeping all children on the same level as the least able insures that they have never been taught to learn, but only to repeat what they have been told.
I may over simplify when I talk to the new trappers, but my instruction is usually along the lines of "put some stinky stuff out there and set a trap some where close to it, what ever trap you have in your hand will probably work". I want them to do something and having done that they then have a basis to learn.


x2 on that what you said


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 22:20 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User

Joined: 23 Nov 2013, 18:04
Posts: 265
Location: Kansas
Love the topic Rob. Stimulates thought, and I spend a lot of time thinking about trapping. Here's my take. First thing here in Kansas I don't have much for natural cover except for grass. Grass works but you need to cut it up pretty fine as you would suspect, it will cause misses. I have used peat moss with success on coyotes but have seen refusal using it so don't use it very often. Now with cats I think its a pretty good covering.

Most of the time when the weather gets crappy, I switch over to more snares than traps. When the weather straightens up and say stays cold I will go back to traps. Frankly I catch more in traps than I do snares, and that's the main reason. I usually always have snares set at the same time as I have traps out. When the ground is froze and stays froze I use dry dirt and antifreeze and have little problems with traps freezing down.

For the dirthole itself I just start going to a mouse sized hole that I make with a rebar drove in the ground and wallowed around. I catch a lot of coyotes in a hole this size. Will it catch more than say a 2-3 inch hole. NO it won't. But it still produces good enough to keep me skinning. I too start switching to more flats as we get further into the winter, because of breeding/territory responses.

Worst weather for me is not so much the cold but wet. When it gets muddy it pretty much shuts me down, just because I can't get onto property with out cutting a rut. This something I just wont' do, so generally pull everything not close to a road and wait till it freezes up or dries enough to get back after it.
J


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 22:43 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User

Joined: 17 Jan 2008, 10:51
Posts: 914
tjm wrote:
they have never been taught to learn, but only to repeat what they have been told.


This dont only go for kids. These are some clear ringing notes to me. I see major problems of Newer trappers following other mens teachings, and changing minds of adult folks id have considered leaders and innovators, into mini me's of their own thought processes. Even things that I know for a fact that are wrong ways of thinking. Todays newish trappers try to mimic these pro trappers down to the very T. What is bad is they hold all the teachings as fact and gospel even if they themselves have never experienced it or on limited experiances in dealing with things. Im so fed up with the pro trappers making mindless robots into clones of themselves. It is destroying and cheapening the element of experience because it closes the mind to all else, and its all brought to you via any number of media avenues. Makes me wanna puke. I see that happening rampant and wide spread. It worries me much because I feel many are being led away like sheep to slaughter and whats more they dont seem to care. To the author, its a money grab, but to the would be student its devastating .....even if they dont realize it.

Anymore I only recommed books and such about the animal themselves, because in the end thats what causes the mind to be able to make true connections and untainted views.

_________________
}}}}}=========€ >


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jan 2015, 23:20 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 09 Nov 2010, 11:58
Posts: 1302
Location: Kansas
Amak wrote:
tjm wrote:
they have never been taught to learn, but only to repeat what they have been told.


This dont only go for kids. These are some clear ringing notes to me. I see major problems of Newer trappers following other mens teachings, and changing minds of adult folks id have considered leaders and innovators, into mini me's of their own thought processes. Even things that I know for a fact that are wrong ways of thinking. Todays newish trappers try to mimic these pro trappers down to the very T. What is bad is they hold all the teachings as fact and gospel even if they themselves have never experienced it or on limited experiances in dealing with things. Im so fed up with the pro trappers making mindless robots into clones of themselves. It is destroying and cheapening the element of experience because it closes the mind to all else, and its all brought to you via any number of media avenues. Makes me wanna puke. I see that happening rampant and wide spread. It worries me much because I feel many are being led away like sheep to slaughter and whats more they dont seem to care. To the author, its a money grab, but to the would be student its devastating .....even if they dont realize it.

Anymore I only recommed books and such about the animal themselves, because in the end thats what causes the mind to be able to make true connections and untainted views.

That was very well said brother!

_________________
A WISE MAN PROFITS BY THE MISTAKES HE MAKES.
A FOOL NEVER SEES THE ONE HE MAKES. (Harold Warp)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Jan 2015, 04:41 
Offline
Trapper
Trapper

Joined: 02 May 2013, 08:05
Posts: 81
Location: SW Mo
I use a variation of dirt hole that rarely has problems. Picture a pocket set against a steep hillside, works well along a game trail or upper bank of log trail. Make fox step up one step from trail, to a small shelf where the trap is. Drainage is built into the shelf and the hole won't fill up with rain. Never had a fox approach from the rear. Poke two or three small holes it looks like a chipmunk house.
If no hill available there may be a ditch bank.

I know now though that I've done this wrong for many years. I've seen pictures on the net of what a hole is supposed to look like.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 44 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group