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 Post subject: Old Pics From My Area
PostPosted: 02 Feb 2014, 12:44 
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Location: Windber, PA
Here are some pictures from the area where I live. These pictures are from the late 1800's and very early 1900's.

The first 2 pictures are of the lumber operations in what is now the Gallitzin State Forest which is behind my house.

This is Steam Locomotive Number 6 hauling logs out of the Clear Shade Creek Valley.

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Babcock Lumber Company's rail line and logging operation.

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Babcock Lumber Company's Mill located in Seanor, PA.

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When a lumber company came through to do a logging operation, they used to say scalp it level. This was given the name to this town called Scalp Level, PA. This was taken in 1894.

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PostPosted: 02 Feb 2014, 13:24 
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great pic.s...that old locomotive had a head of steam up...

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PostPosted: 02 Feb 2014, 13:28 
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Good old pictures TR. I'll bet it was easier to go downhill than uphill! :shock: Reckon what the "bundles" of stuff are along side the tracks amid all the logs?

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PostPosted: 02 Feb 2014, 14:12 
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Most of the PA guys may know this already but many (if not most) of the PA State forests became public after cut-over land in the state in the late 19th and early 20th century was "abandoned" by the owners (most large scale operations who just wanted the wood) after the merchantable timber was removed. Northern PA was the first place where railroad logging (building small spur lines up valleys and having logs skidded to them) was practiced starting after the Civil War (War Between the States). The old growth white pine (and hemlock as a secondary source) was cut first and then the hardwoods later. Industrial wood guys at the time did not want to wait around for new forests so the mantra was "cut and get out" and move to somewhere else. By the early 1930s, there really wasn't any place left to run to "virgin" forests except some areas of the Pacific NW. That's when the true science and land use of forestry began in the U.S. Many of you may not know it, but U.S. southern forestry is the most prolific commercial forest in the world (something such as around 15% of the global output of industrial wood around 2000--that may have changed a bit since then but probably not a lot). This production is based on regrowing new trees for the next cutting 20-40 years down the road.

North America is the most important region for boreal and temperate softwood production

U.S. is most important for temperate hardwood production

Most important tropical hardwood production--well, that isn't us here is it...

There's a nice little journal article that came out in the Pennsylvania Geographer that covers a lot of the land use history of n. PA as well as what goes on there now (circa 1973-2000). If anyone is interested, you can go to your library and get it inter-library loan. Here's the details on the article:

Land use and land cover change in the north-central Appalachians ecoregion

Darrell Napton, and others
Pennsylvania Geographer 01/2003; 41(2):46-66.

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PostPosted: 02 Feb 2014, 14:20 
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Very cool pics. Nice info too PC. Gramps logged in Maine some and the northern states. Love the recipes from those camps. Very hardy men. Ive logged in the modern era and its hard work with all the new technology. Cant imagine a 10'+ crosscut saw being the top of the line modern equipment.

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PostPosted: 02 Feb 2014, 16:29 
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Nice pictures TR. Here in my county there is a good bit of County Tax Forfeited land. Same explanation as NPCF gave.

Trapping regulations were probably a little more relaxed in those days. I know E.N. Woodcock trapped in Potter County in that era.

Pierre

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