Welcome to the Wild-About-Trapping.com Forums

Friends, Family and Outdoor Traditions
It is currently 19 Oct 2017, 18:52

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: 06 Nov 2006, 15:03 
Offline
HATCHET MAN
HATCHET MAN
User avatar

Joined: 30 Aug 2006, 10:13
Posts: 1561
Location: The Withers of Wisconsin
http://desmoinesregister.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061105/SPORTS10/611050357/1003/SPORTS

Published November 5, 2006

In the Open: Trappers excited for nearing otter season

By JULI PROBASCO-SOWERS
REGISTER STAFF WRITER


Several thousand trappers across Iowa geared up this week for the state's first otter trapping season.

"There is a lot of excitement amongst trappers," said Jaimie Beyer of rural Boone, a long-time trapper and an active member in the Iowa Trappers Association. "It is a brand new season, we have never been able to tack otters. It is not only a whole new specie, it is an extremely valuable species, as well."

Last year, otter pelts were selling for more than $100 in the United States. This year, the prices may be lower, said Ron Andrews, fur-bearing animal resource specialist for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

The limited season, which allows only 400 otters to be taken, was approved by the Iowa Natural Resources Commission and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said Andrews.

"Because river otter hides closely resemble the sea otter, everything dealing with the otter and trapping has to be approved by and reported to the federal government," he said.

Andrews said he does not believe the new season will significantly increase the number of fur-harvesting licenses in the state.

"We have about 7,000 right now," he said. "With younger people just not getting into the trapping as much, there are so many other things to do, I just don't think it will have a big impact."

Biologically, the taking of 400 otters will not hurt the state's now-burgeoning population, Andrews said.

Iowa's otter population had been decimated by unregulated trapping to the point that the otters were only found in the northeast corner of Iowa by 1900. In 1985, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources began to release otters. The release program turned out 325 otters in 25 different areas from 1985 to 1992. In the last few years, the population growth has been 4 percent to 8 percent per year. Andrews estimates 7,000 otters live in Iowa.

He and other biologists believe that number and the annual growth warrant the limited trapping season. The otter trapping season aligns with all other Iowa trapping seasons by starting Saturday and continuing through Jan. 31. However, no more otters can be trapped once the 400 limit has been reached, Andrews said. Each individual trapper will be allowed to take only two otters. When an otter is trapped, the person must contact the local conservation officer, who will check the otter, take down some biological information such as age, weight and reproduction, and place a tag on the animal that is required by the federal government.

Trapping is the only option to control river otters, Andrews said. If otter numbers get too large in an area, they can significantly reduce the frog and fish populations because fish and frogs are a staple in their diet.

The trapping community in Iowa helped significantly in the otter reintroduction, he added. Trappers put up $20,000 from the Iowa Trappers Association, the Iowa furtakers and the Fisheries and Biology Club at Iowa State University in Ames to purchase about 50 otters for the program, Andrews said.

Otter fur is sought-after by the clothing industry, which uses the fur as trim on collars, sleeves and coats.

"Otter fur is very durable, in fact the most durable of fur bearers," said Beyer. "It is a fur that is thick, and the larger diameter of the guard hair that protects underfur is luxurious and thick."

Andrews said a move to also create a limited trapping season for bobcats, another species that has made a population comeback in Iowa, was taken off the table for this year.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: 06 Nov 2006, 15:09 
Offline
HATCHET MAN
HATCHET MAN
User avatar

Joined: 30 Aug 2006, 10:13
Posts: 1561
Location: The Withers of Wisconsin
Quote:
The trapping community in Iowa helped significantly in the otter reintroduction, he added. Trappers put up $20,000 from the Iowa Trappers Association, the Iowa furtakers and the Fisheries and Biology Club at Iowa State University in Ames to purchase about 50 otters for the program, Andrews said.


There's just another example of how trappers are benefitting wildlife populations in Iowa and around the country. How many of the animal welfare groups spend that kind of money to help re-establish a population of animals?

_________________
Molon Labe.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group