Welcome to the Wild-About-Trapping.com Forums

Friends, Family and Outdoor Traditions
It is currently 18 Oct 2017, 09:58

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2016, 12:11 
Offline
POST-JACKING AND PIXEL SIZE CZAR (P.J.A.P.S.C.)
POST-JACKING AND PIXEL SIZE CZAR (P.J.A.P.S.C.)

Joined: 25 Dec 2007, 23:33
Posts: 11245
Location: Alberta, Canada
Seeing as we are mostly[if not all] outdoors type people here, I want to see what you guys think. I've hunted for nearly 50 years and was brought up to eat what we kill. Over the years I've gone through the horn hunting and all the nonsense about bigger is better. Last night the wife cooked up a moose roast from Donny's 2 year old cow moose and I can honestly say it was as good as any moose I've ever eaten. I quit horn hunting for this reason some 25+ years ago as I have never eaten really superb meat from old male animals. As a farmer we never butchered the old range bulls, big boar hogs or the old rooster for meat.
Am I nuts thinking like this?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2016, 12:28 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User

Joined: 06 Jan 2011, 23:10
Posts: 738
Location: NW Oregon
Talked with an old sheep herder, in the high country of Colorado, almost fifty years ago. He said , if you want a good eating buckskin, you would want either a small, young buck, a dry doe, or the oldest buck you could find. His reasoning, on the old buck, was that the teeth were worn down and it needed to be selective of what it ate. Needing to eat only the most tender of forage and not running all over looking for does, the meat would be more tender. As another friend was fond of saying, "You can't eat the horns and track soup is pretty poor table fare."


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2016, 16:28 
Offline
THE LAST WORD
THE LAST WORD

Joined: 14 Mar 2008, 20:20
Posts: 11647
Location: west virginia
No doubt young meat is more tender and tasty, but I don't like to waste any meat no matter how old. When I butcher old roosters or old hens, I can them. Pressure canning makes the meat nice and tender. If I kill an old buck, I can the meat or make burger out of it. Aging older animals helps with tenderness and taste also if you can control the temperature.

_________________
Those who trade liberty for security shall have neither.

"Take ye heed,watch and pray: for ye know not when the time is".

Rev. 6:8 and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was death , and Hell followed with him.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2016, 20:43 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper

Joined: 28 Jan 2011, 16:07
Posts: 3078
Location: northwestern Ontario
Was never a horn hunter. Big fancy horns don't give good meat. Killed a lot of moose over my years and the 2 and 3 year olds are the best. Even some older then that. Like you TT I eat what I kill but there is an exception when it comes to road kill :roll:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2016, 23:47 
Offline
THE LAST WORD
THE LAST WORD

Joined: 14 Mar 2008, 20:20
Posts: 11647
Location: west virginia
wolf1199 wrote:
Was never a horn hunter. Big fancy horns don't give good meat. Killed a lot of moose over my years and the 2 and 3 year olds are the best. Even some older then that. Like you TT I eat what I kill but there is an exception when it comes to road kill :roll:


Road kill is awesome wolf. Don't know what you're missin. Not only is it tenderized for you, it's usually skinned too. 8) :lol: :lol:

_________________
Those who trade liberty for security shall have neither.

"Take ye heed,watch and pray: for ye know not when the time is".

Rev. 6:8 and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was death , and Hell followed with him.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2016, 21:29 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 24 Dec 2009, 15:09
Posts: 3736
Location: Eastern S. Dakota
Trappintime- I shoot generally what's gets in front of me, often its the choice offered or nothing. A lot of time we have a combo tag where its 1 any deer (or antelope) and 1 anterless so usually the first doe that gets in front of me gets shot at. I may pass up a fawn right off the start if we're seeing animals but sometimes no. You probably can hunt the same ground year after year in a nearby place but I tend to be a big game (for me here I mean deer and antelope) gypsy because the situations tend to be fluid; friendships and acquaintances change, the situation turns out not to be as described, its marginal public land so there's a search for something better. If turkey is counted as a big game species (and in this state it is), I've taken approximately 70 critters in 24 out of the 67 counties in South Dakota, although the mostly reservation counties are probably off the list for me.

I've never knocked over a moose or elk (never have even tasted moose) so my "what's better, an older buck or a young one" is limited to just deer and antelope. I'm personally not overly jazzed on the flavor of venison either young or old, I think there is a slight livery or something taste to it. I eat back loin steaks, will cut some sirloins, and eat a roast or two but usually with a good amount of bbq sauce to dip it in or put on the bread if making a sandwich. Some steak meat is cut up into small cubes for chislic (again eaten with bbq sauce), some is cut for jerky, and the grind goes into making deer sticks. I actually think antelope is a milder tasting meat than deer. Now the elk I've had is another story, much closer than beef than any other hoofed critter I've tasted. If I lived in Rapid City, I'd be bow hunting those things annually and applying in the Black Hills when I could (last time I knew, if a person had a BH elk tag, they weren't eligible again to start applying for 9 years so you'll never get very many elk in this state--I don't have enough allowance money to go further west as a non-resident, maybe some day). It is what it is.

_________________
"And God said, Let us make man in our image …and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, …the fowl of the air…and all the creatures that move along the ground.
Genesis 1:26


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2016, 05:05 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 12 Sep 2010, 11:36
Posts: 6397
Location: Windber, PA
I posted pictures of my yearling doe I harvested a little over a month ago. An excellent tasting deer it is. A few years ago, I got a big 8 point buck. He had grey on his face and he looked like an old timer. The venison was OK I thought but the family didn't like it at all.
As far as any other wild game goes, if I harvested it, it was eaten. Pheasant, grouse, woodcock, dove, rabbit and squirrel.

_________________
Ready for the 2017-18 Trapping Season!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2016, 07:17 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 24 Dec 2009, 15:09
Posts: 3736
Location: Eastern S. Dakota
tRick- Is woodcock a dark or light meat?? I've never hunted or eaten any. I found one once sitting at the base of some trailer steps of one of my college housing one fall in Brookings, SD which is about 20 miles west of the MN border about half way up the east side of SD. I picked it up and looked at it, it looked at me, and I put it down again. It had a little blood on its bill. Came back from class in the afternoon and it was gone. Must have been blown off course somehow out of the wooded area of northern MN. Strange find for that place.

_________________
"And God said, Let us make man in our image …and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, …the fowl of the air…and all the creatures that move along the ground.
Genesis 1:26


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2016, 12:52 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User

Joined: 06 Jan 2011, 23:10
Posts: 738
Location: NW Oregon
NonPC,

Try taking that venison steak over a pile of charcoal. Half melt some bacon drippings and smear it on the steak. Keep turning the steak over and add more drippings to keep the meat moist. Dripping fall onto the coals and "smoke" the meat. Might be hard on the arteries, but man what a great steak. Makes my mouth water just thinking of it.

REM


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Wild game fare.
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2016, 16:23 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User
User avatar

Joined: 07 Nov 2012, 08:24
Posts: 656
Location: La Junta, Co.
Always amused me to hear about guys, who shoot big nasty raunchy musky male what evers, then can't understand why the "little woman" refuses to cook it and the over civilized kid folk refuse to eat it.
I've always gone for the nice large female deer or yearling bucks or bulls.
Having spent 13 years as a camp cook at an archery camp in central Montana's Missouri Breaks, I've cooked some nasty meat that the hunter thought was great. Most of them were horn hunters. Lots of times thats all they wanted and gave the meat away to us or the locals.
:)
Had moose, elk, deer, bear, never cat, but my favorite wild meat so far is by far Antelope. Oh and of course Bear.
Happy hunting. cook meat hot and fast, turn once with blood rises to the top. Lots of garlic.

_________________
" She's got the heart of a poet and the emotional makeup of a junk yard dog " ~ Stephen King
"Cremation, my last hope for a smok'n hot body" ~ Facebook
Image
FREEDOM~LIBERTY


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group