Welcome to the Wild-About-Trapping.com Forums

Friends, Family and Outdoor Traditions
It is currently 16 Dec 2017, 13:44

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Fossils in Fur country
PostPosted: 19 Jan 2013, 12:53 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User
User avatar

Joined: 07 Nov 2012, 08:24
Posts: 667
Location: La Junta, Co.
One very interesting thing about trapping or hunting in central Mt. and over into the Dakotas is the very common joy of finding cool fossils. Just about every time we went walking we would find marine fossils and occasionally a reptile or dinosaur fossil. The area where we live(d) is known for some of the best complete T-Rex fossils as they, as well as the Triceratops were as common in that area as elk are today. Most of central Mt was once covered by an inland sea so the different types of marine fossils are numerous, especially in the valleys, and creek beds. The sea bed was once relatively flat and over millions of years the erosion of the mostly rockless soil has exposed layers of soils and also washed smaller fossils into the valleys, coulees, and creeks. We found so many marine fossils that we just tossed them aside unless they were primo examples.
An example of the erosion, and yes, those are guard rails. :shock:
Image
Image
Image

Here are some examples of marine fossils
The first one is an Amonite, or Rams Horn. This is a tiny one, there is a small museum in Round Up Mt. that has one about three feet across.
Image
Petrified Coral
Image
Some sort of small shell
Image
This sort of fossil rock is called a Conglomerate
Image
This is the hinge from some sort of clam type shell
Image

My all time favorite marine fossil, the BACULITE, is one with a bit of Native American history.

The Blackfeet were known to have, and still do, valued this fossil when it was broken into small segments and having been rolled around enough to smooth out the rough edges to rounded ones. They believed the rock to resemble a buffalo and were gathered, wrapped in buffalon hair and hide and put in a special pouch which hung on a tripod near their lodge in the belief that when prayed and smoked to, the buffalo rock, or as they called it,, INISKIM, would bring back thier beloved buffalo.
The INISKIM The one on the right is a prime example. In the photo above, you can see the ends of some iniskim/Baculite shells that have been exposed but not having broken off in segments and rolled around for millennia until smooth.
Image
Image
These are Baculites when alive. When alive they had long conical shells.
Image
Some of the iniskim we found still had a layer of glossy shell but most shells' sheen had been worn away.
We rarely found a conical shaped shell over a foot long, simply because they had been broken apart over the eons of being rolled around.
Image
A group photo of various marine fossils. Note the long ones in the back, those are baculite with no iridescent exterior. The Baculite lower left was the best ever that I found. Not sure what caused it to have those colors and a crystal like interior, but it is stunning.
Image
Another group of marine fossils on an ancient rock solid sea bed or shore
Image
Besides marine fossils, we, or people we know, have found other fossils quite interesting.
We found these scratches underneath a rock ledge on probably was once a river bank or sea shore
Image
These cylindrical shaped things are called Concretions. They were formed as a result of "something" being filled in with a certain mineral. These were taken from the edge of a cliff. I suspect minerals filled bones, and here's why.
Image
Image
Image
Image
Here is the base of the cliff
Image
Where we found these examples of what we had identified as segments from a Triceratops tail
Image
Image
But the all time most fantastic, amazing find was by one of the hunters who stayed at our lodge for a while. He came back from a morning hunt, and having seen my collection of fossils, handed this to me to keep. As he handed it to me it fell into pieces and I immediately recognized it for what it is, a fossilized reptile egg. If you look closely you can see the fossilized skeleton of some sort of reptile. ( the fly is fairly new haha) It was such an amazing find, and the guy had walked for miles with a leg brace on, and I knew he had a young son, so I gave it back to him and told him it was something he needed to keep. darn ! Im just too nice ! He said he'd found it up high. On land that was still at the original level before the ground around it had been eroded away. Same level as where the concretions are and near same level as where we found the triceratops tail vertebra.
Image

Disclaimer~ All of these fossils were found on private land.

_________________
" She's got the heart of a poet and the emotional makeup of a junk yard dog " ~ Stephen King
"Cremation, my last hope for a smok'n hot body" ~ Facebook
Image
FREEDOM~LIBERTY


Last edited by Musselshellgal on 19 Jan 2013, 22:34, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Jan 2013, 18:42 
Offline
THE LAST WORD
THE LAST WORD

Joined: 14 Mar 2008, 20:20
Posts: 11733
Location: west virginia
Wow those are amazing !! We have lots of fossils here but nothing like those. Mostly brachiopods and trilobites, but for some reason I have never found an entire trilobite fossil, only half.

_________________
Those who trade liberty for security shall have neither.

"Take ye heed,watch and pray: for ye know not when the time is".

Rev. 6:8 and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was death , and Hell followed with him.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Jan 2013, 21:26 
Offline
Professional Trapper
Professional Trapper
User avatar

Joined: 24 Dec 2009, 15:09
Posts: 3745
Location: Eastern S. Dakota
MG- That's some serious Badlands!! Ever been through Badlands NP in South Dakota?? I've hunted pronghorns on Buffalo Gap Nat'l Grasslands the surround the park on numerous occasions.

Good disclaimer on where the fossils were found. My federal colleagues, unfortunately, get all bent out of shape about collection of fossil and Native artifacts on federal land (a number of laws have been passed over the past couple of decades that makes picking these items FORBODDIN!!). A colleague of mine from work (about as liberal as they come) got pinched by the Corps of Engineer's "Ranger" after he posted a story about his 2nd grade son's "best day" when they found some fossils along the base of a Missouri River reservior's low water wall. The CoE Ranger's asked the guy to point on a multi-colored map where they had found the fossils (never mind that the fossil deposits go back from the wall for ??? miles and that the exposed fossils seldom last long in one piece after they get exposed because of continued erosion, especially when water levels come back up--but don't let common sense stand in the way of a good rousting of a "criminal").

Anyway, the ranger gathered up some of the fossils but was more interested in my colleague taking down his posting of the "honey hole" of the fossils location--remember that these fossils pop up almost anywhere along hundreds of miles of Missouri River reservior bluffs because they are of the same sediment deposits!!).

Picking up Native artifacts, especially bones, off of federal land, gets them riled up even more so than fossils, primarily because of NAGPRA (see link below). If a real Native grave is found around here, 12+ tribes, ranging from Manitoba to Kansas, have to be notified. How they determine which one gets to have a party to rebury the bones, I don't know, but there must be some formula. Anyway, Native artifcats from public land is extremely naughty. They appear to be pushing towards artifacts from private land being under increasing scrutiny as well, because who they ultimately "belong to" (my ancestors were here 500 years ago, so they must be ours...) can be letigated. Another example of the PC world :cry:

http://www.nps.gov/nagpra/

_________________
"And God said, Let us make man in our image …and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, …the fowl of the air…and all the creatures that move along the ground.
Genesis 1:26


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Jan 2013, 22:48 
Offline
Experienced Forum User
Experienced Forum User
User avatar

Joined: 07 Nov 2012, 08:24
Posts: 667
Location: La Junta, Co.
Yes the Missouri Breaks are pretty rugged. I love that area. I had always lived in the mountains and trees, and it took me a while to appreciate the beauty of wide open spaces. Truly an amazing area. So are the badlands in the Dakotas !

Very interesting link. I'm glad to see that exists.
mg

_________________
" She's got the heart of a poet and the emotional makeup of a junk yard dog " ~ Stephen King
"Cremation, my last hope for a smok'n hot body" ~ Facebook
Image
FREEDOM~LIBERTY


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group